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TRUMP, RUSSIA AND SANCTIONS

January 29, 2018

TRUMP, RUSSIA AND SANCTIONS

Several months ago Congress passed a bipartisan and virtually unanimous veto-proof bill for sanctions against Russia for interfering in our election, setting dates for their implementation by Trump, who was opposed to the bill but had no alternative but to sign it or see his veto overridden. Sanctions against Russia, Iran and other powers who are found to have acted against our core interests are enforceable through his Secretary of Commerce, Wilbur Ross.

Trump and Ross have been dragging their feet on the implementation of these legislatively set sanctions against Russia for interfering in our electoral process, but today, January 29, is the last day legislatively set for implementation. The president is sworn to faithfully execute the laws, but it appears he will be in breach of his sworn duty at midnight tonight unless he implements the sanctions set by Congress. He seems to think he can override congressional intent with inaction but his logic is misplaced; it is rather the Congress that can override his vetoes and call him to account for his inaction, all under the constitutional banner of Separation of Powers. If the sanctions the Congress set against Russia for its interference in our elections are not implemented today, the appropriate committee should, in my opinion, summon Ross to a hearing to find out why he and Trump are not following the law.

The foregoing is prologue and designed to provide background for understanding why Trump and Ross are tardy in implementing sanctions against Russia as ordered by the Congress. Prior to coming to Washington to serve as Trump’s Commerce Secretary, Ross was the co-manager of the Bank of Cyprus along with a Russian friendly with Putin. The Bank of Cyprus was well known as a money laundering institution used by Putin and Russian oligarchs via shell corporations, trustees and other fronts for laundering Russian rubles into Western currencies and other assets such as real estate, equities etc.

A recent report is to the effect that 70% of Trump’s recent real estate sales have been to shell corporations and trustees designed to hide the identity of the true owners, and I have a question > Were they sales or a front for money laundering? Why ask? Because Trump recently sold a piece of property in Florida to a Russian oligarch for some 82 million dollars that he had paid only 40 million dollars for not long before. I understand buying low and selling high but with a profit margin in excess of 100 percent, I smell a rat – and that’s only one transaction among many. (See my earlier blog, Trump and the Deutsche Bank.)

I have written for months that Trump’s removal from office may (along with obstruction and conspiracy)  be because of his money laundering antics which lately have shifted from the Bank of Cyprus to the Deutsche Bank, another well-known money laundering institution which has been fined billions of dollars for fraud and money laundering in the past, a bank which mysteriously made hundreds of millions of dollars in loans to Trump and his son in law Kushner when no other bank on Wall Street would. I don’t know whether they were loans or bribes, and the reason why is because Trump in December of 2017 signed a directive giving Deutsche Bank a three-year exemption from sanctions which but for such exemption from Trump’s Department of Labor would not allow Deutsche to engage in the very lucrative trillion dollar business of managing retirement funds.

I think but cannot prove beyond a reasonable doubt with what I know so far that both Trump and Ross are money launderers and that this explains at least in part their coziness with their fellow money launderer, Putin, and I hope that Mueller with his subpoena powers has perhaps already made such a determination and has added that to his list for presentation to a grand jury for indictment and/or to the Congress for impeachment purposes. It appears greed and corruption know no boundaries.   GERALD    E

 

 

 

 

 

 

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